Annie Leibovitz or Woman Who Changed Photography

Annie Leibovitz photo

She shot her first pictures when she was in Philippines during the Vietnam War and started her photography career in 1970 in Rolling Stones magazine that was just launched at that time. Jann Wenner, the founding editor of the magazine, was stunned with her work and gave her the first assignment, taking a photo of John Lennon for the cover page.

Six Photography Rules, Jumpology, and Dali: Philippe Halsman Biography

Photo by Philippe Halsman
  1. Be straightforward to create a strong photo.
  2. Use light, angle, and composition in a non-conventional way.
  3. Add something strange, unusual, and out-of-place to the photo to attract the viewer's attention.
  4. Go against the viewer's expectations by removing or hiding something in the photo.
  5. Combine all of that to make the photo even more unusual.
  6. Show the subject as clearly as possible to illustrate the message.

Eve Arnold and Photojournalism: Capturing the Rich and the Mundane

Photo by Eve Arnold

Eve Arnold was one of the nine children of a Russian-Jewish family that immigrated to the New World because of prosecution by then-Soviet state. As her father didn't manage to find a good job, the family lived very humbly, and that was probably one of the biggest things that influenced her photography style.

Henri Cartier-Bresson: Surrealism, Photojournalism, and Outdoor Photography

Photo by Henri-Cartier Bresson

Henri Cartier-Bresson was born in 1908 in a bourgeoisie family of a wealth French textile manufacturer and was talked to in vous rather than in tu—meaning an extreme amount of correctness and familiarity—to become the owner of the family business afterwards.

However he was not really inspired by this idea and preferred taking holiday photos with a Brownie Box and 3×4 inch view cameras as well as sketching in his spare time, which he could afford because his family helped him in every new devotion.